#11 Paddling Pic: Dry Rivers & Sharp Rocks


#11 Missinaibi River, Ontario. 2002

We do a lot of our longer trips in the fall as we both work in paddlesports during the spring/summer. These fall trips often mean low water, which can be interesting in many ways. The cool part is seeing the river when there is no water in it! The river morphology and geology are fascinating and in this case, at the appropriately named Sharp Rock Rapids, just a little sobering. The thought of swimming through this rapid in higher water is terrifying to me and reinforces the mantra "never stand up in a rapid". It also brings to mind my Dad's short-filmhttps://www.nfb.ca/film/face_of_the_earth/which doesn't feature any canoes but is a nice primer about geology. So today I'm thinking riverbeds. Under all that water a riverbed can be a boulder field, a fun slide, a big sand box, or a dreaded canoe-eating food-processor. Anyone have an interesting riverbed story? Like...did that riverbed ever wrap your canoe?🤔


About Today's Paddling Pic: These last few days and weeks I've found myself looking back on some wonderful memories and images of where canoeing has taken me, and it's made me smile. I feel so fortunate and grateful for these places, people and experiences, and it's kind of nice to reminisce. And in doing so I can't help but to also look forward to a time when we can all paddle safely again! So for the next while Reid and I are posting a picture a day (with a story) that will brighten our day and hopefully yours too. I invite you to share your stories in the comment section.

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