#9 Paddling Pic: Windbound

#9 Dog River, Ontario. 1990

I'm missing my family this Easter and it is starting to feel a bit like being windbound. I've spent a fair bit of time waiting for the wind to drop on Lake Superior. One September we paddled the White River and were met with huge waves and wind at the Lake. It's too long and layered to tell the whole story but let's just say that after a few days of waiting we walked out with our packs (it might have been about a 5km hike) but in doing so I partially separated my shoulder so we went to the hospital instead of getting our canoe. Meanwhile another group of 6 we met at the mouth paddled out and although they somehow made it they had near-death experiences which severed friendships and had long lasting effects.😡We finally hired a boat shuttle to rescue our stashed canoe (we had left a note on it explaining our situation) and found another note on it from hikers who had used it to rescue their tent that had blown off their cliff-side campsite into the river and was floating upright on its way to the lake! They were extremely grateful to have found our canoe and paddles and it made for a happy story to end an eventful trip. Some find being windbound boring or frustrating but I find it can be rejuvenating and a time for reflection. Anybody else been windbound for better or for worse?


About Today's Paddling Pic:

These last few days and weeks I've found myself looking back on some wonderful memories and images of where canoeing has taken me, and it's made me smile. I feel so fortunate and grateful for these places, people and experiences, and it's kind of nice to reminisce. And in doing so I can't help but to also look forward to a time when we can all paddle safely again! So for the next while Reid and I are posting a picture a day (with a story) that will brighten our day and hopefully yours too. I invite you to share your stories in the comment section.

logo-optmiz-0quality-small.gif

redcanoes.ca 

Chelsea, Quebec

copyright 2020